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Thursday, March 29, 2018

3rd Battalion 133rd Field Artillery Regiment Commander Coin

The 133rd Field Artillery Regiment is a field artillery regiment of the Army National Guard, first constituted in 1899. The 133rd Field Artillery Regiment's lineage is carried by 1st Battalion, 133rd Field Artillery, a unit of the 72nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, and 3rd Battalion, 133rd Field Artillery, a unit of the 56th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, both brigades of the 36th Infantry Division.

From August 2008 to August 2009 Charlie Battery deployed as a filler unit to 3rd BN 133rd Filed Artillery (56th IBCT) in support of Iraqi Freedom. C Battery was based out of COB Adder, Tallil, Iraq carrying out the mission of Convoy Security. During the deployment, C Battery conducted over 120 Convoy Security Missions. 1 Member of the battery was awarded the Purple Heart for wounds sustained. C Battery redeployed in August 2009 and was returned to its organic Battalion. In 2011 Charlie Battery was inactivated, while 4th 133rd was reorganized into a HIMARS Battalion.

In October 2009, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, Alpha Battery, and Bravo Battery from 1st Battalion, 133d Field Artillery were mobilized for service in Operation Iraqi Freedom as part of the 72nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team. After completing training at Camp McGregor, NM as detainee guard force units, HHB and A Battery were deployed to Camp Cropper, Iraq, with B Battery being sent to Camp Taji, Iraq. The brigade completed operations in Iraq in July and August 2010 and redeployed to the United States, with A Battery being the last unit in the brigade to return home.Echo Battery 1/133 FA 49th AD served in Iraq March 2004 until March 2005. Attached to the 2ID and 36ID. 1st and 3rd counter motor radar units were assigned to FOB Marez, Mozul, Iraq. Other radar units were stationed in different areas of Iraq.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

United States Cyber Command - CYBERCOM


United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) is a Subordinate Unified Combatant Command of U.S. Strategic Command. The Command unifies the direction of cyberspace operations, strengthens DoD cyberspace capabilities, and integrates and bolsters DoD's cyber expertise.
USCYBERCOM was created in 2009 at the National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters in Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. It uses NSA networks and has been headed by the Director of the National Security Agency since its inception. While originally created with a defensive mission in mind, it has increasingly been viewed as an offensive force. On 18 August 2017, it was announced that USCYBERCOM is to be elevated to the status of a full and independent Unified Combatant Command.
According to the US Department of Defense (DoD), USCYBERCOM "plans, coordinates, integrates, synchronizes and conducts activities to: direct the operations and defense of specified Department of Defense information networks and; prepare to, and when directed, conduct full spectrum military cyberspace operations in order to enable actions in all domains, ensure US/Allied freedom of action in cyberspace and deny the same to our adversaries."
The text "9ec4c12949a4f31474f299058ce2b22a", located in the command's emblem, is the MD5 hash of their mission statement.
The command is charged with pulling together existing cyberspace resources, creating synergies and synchronizing war-fighting effects to defend the information security environment. USCYBERCOM is tasked with centralizing command of cyberspace operations, strengthening DoD cyberspace capabilities, and integrating and bolstering DoD's cyber expertise.


As always, artworks featuring the insignia are available via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.

The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Canada Border Services Agency - CBSA

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) (French: Agence des services frontaliers du Canada—ASFC) is a federal agency that is responsible for border enforcement, immigration enforcement and customs services.
The Agency was created on December 12, 2003 by an order-in-council amalgamating Canada Customs (from the now-defunct Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) with border and enforcement personnel from the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The Agency's creation was formalized by the Canada Border Services Agency Act, which received Royal Assent on November 3, 2005.
Since the September 11 attacks against the United States, Canada's border operations have placed an enhanced emphasis on national security and public safety. The Canada–United States Smart Border Declaration, created by John Manley and Tom Ridge, then first U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security of the Department of Homeland Security, has provided objectives for co-operation between Canadian and American border operations.
The CBSA oversees approximately 1,200 service locations across Canada, and 39 in other countries. It employs over 12,000 public servants, and offers around-the-clock service at 119 land border crossings and thirteen international airports.
The Agency oversees operations at three major sea ports and three mail centres, and operates detention facilities known as immigration holding centres in Laval, Toronto, and Vancouver.
The CBSA operates an Inland Enforcement branch, which tracks down and removes foreign nationals who are in Canada illegally. Inland Enforcement Officers are "plain-clothes" units, and are armed with the same sidearm pistol (PX4D Storm chambered in 9×19mm Parabellum) as port of entry Border Services Officers.


As always, the above artworks are available via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, Canadian Heraldic Authority, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation - CDCR SERT and CRTs

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) is responsible for the operation of the California state prison and parole systems. Its headquarters are in Sacramento. CDCR is the 3rd largest law enforcement in the United States behind the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) which is an arm of Dept of Homeland Security (DHS), and the New York City Police Department, which employ approximately 66,000 federal officers and 42,000 police officers respectively. CDCR correctional officers are sworn law enforcement officers with peace officer powers.
Within the CDC emergency situations, and high-risk special assignments are handled by a highly trained specialist unit known as the Special Emergency Response Team, or SERT. Every level II through IV facility is required to maintain a SERT. SERTs are used in situations when regular institutional forces are unable to maintain or regain control of a situation, or when the situation is of such a high-risk, that the SERT's specialized skills and equipment are deemed useful. When employed, a SERTs primary responsibility is "To save lives and protect property".
SERT teams are composed of volunteer personnel, who when not training or activated, are assigned to regular full-time correctional duty assignments. Team size varies from institution to institution (12-21 members) depending on the size of the facility, its location, the institution's security level, inmate population, and the response time of addtional support units. All SERT personnel are on 24 hour standby to be recalled to their assigned institution, or to any other institution needing assistance.
SERTs can trace their origins to the loosely organized tactical teams formed during the sixty's and seventy's to deal with disturbances within CDC facilities. These teams had no formalized training, structure, equipment or standardized operating procedures (SOPs). In 1982 the Director authorized a an assessment to study the Departments ability to respond to disturbances within CDC facilities. Upon completion of the assessment the Director recommended the establishment of a Disturbance Control Program with in the CDC. SERTs were a major component of the new program, and in May 1983 the department conducted its first formalized SERT training academy, with official authorization and funding being granted by the Governor and state Legislator in July of 1984.

For fine art pieces and other products with my law enforcement artwork, please visit my 'Law Enforcement Insignia & Heraldry' galleries at FineArt America and RedBubble. Also, don’t forget to navigate to Special Operations Group website and check out their extensive product selections. Upon request, artwork in those galleries can be customized with ranks and, wherever appropriate - individual badge numbers. 
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